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November 2018 Indigenous Stories Related Resources: The Birchbark House

 Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.

Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.

Our resources this week focus on all things related to The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich.  We’re excited to share links and information that will help you get dive deeper into the ideas and topics mentioned in this novel.

RESOURCES RELATED TO THE BIRCHBARK HOUSE

This book trailer for The Birchbark House is a great way to introduce the book to your younger readers! Reading is Fundamental also has some activities to complete as you read.

If you’re interested in comparing the creation story of Omakayas’ culture with other creation stories around the world, Virginia Hamilton’s In the Beginning: Creation Stories Around the World provides a cursory glance at 25 such stories.

Looking for more books to pair with The Birchbark House other than our picks this month? Book Riot has a great list!  

Omakayas spends a lot of time trying to help name her brother.  Learn more about the importance of naming in Native American culture.

Learn more about the Anishinaabe-Ojibwe people and their culture.  There’s even a map to see their migration!

Smallpox is a serious infectious disease that the CDC says dates back to ancient Egypt (around the 3rd century). While its symptoms goes through stages, if a person survives the disease they are immune in the future.  Presently, smallpox has been eradicated, but there is enough of the vaccine to vaccinate every person in the US if a smallpox outbreak were to occur.

The Native American Smallpox Epidemic was disastrous due to lack of proper healthcare or improper conditions.  Learn more about the epidemic here. PBS also provides a concise overview of smallpox effect on indigenous cultures.

In recent news, an Alaskan resolution “says that native languages are being lost at a rapid pace because the last remaining fluent speakers are dying of old age. It says that the preservation of language equates to the preservation of culture.”