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October 2017 Related Resources: Refugee and Immigrant Experiences

 Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.

Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.


RESOURCES RELATED TO REFUGEE

Let’s start off by taking a look at the book trailer for Refugee! 

If you’re looking for information to share on Adolf Hitler with your younger readers, the History Channel has a biography that you can use to start the conversation. 

Kristallnacht is also known as the “Night of Broken Glass,” when “over 250 synagogues were burned, over 7,000 Jewish businesses were trashed and looted, dozens of Jewish people were killed, and Jewish cemeteries, hospitals, schools, and homes were looted”. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has great information for students, teachers, and parents to use to learn more and discuss together. 

Josef and his family are excited for him to celebrate his bar mitzvah after he turns thirteen. Here is a great video explaining a bit more about the significance of this celebration. 

If you’d like a text explanation of what to expect during a bar or bat mitzvah, this sitehas definitions and explanations of everything you’ll need to know. 

A minyan is a quorum of at least ten men for religious ceremonies like bar mitzvahs in the Jewish faith. Learn more about the significance of the minyan here.

A yarmulke is a head covering Jewish men wear during ceremonies or religious events. The BBC has several examples and a great explanation of the yarmulke’s significance. 

The Dachau Memorial Site website and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museumboth have extensive information about Dachau Concentration Camp. You can find even more resources on their site as well, including photos and first-hand accounts.

Emigration from Cuba isn’t a thing of the past. The New York Times highlighted another wave of emigrants by boat in 2014. 

Cuban dictator Batista was overthrown by Fidel Castro in 1959. Learn more about the uprising here. 

You can watch the documentary, Buena Vista Social Club about Cuban musicians and get a sense of the Cuban music from the era of Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista, the man Fidel Castro overthrew. The full album is also on YouTube!

This is a great quick overview of Fidel Castro's life for kiddos and adults from Biography. 

Violet Isle, a nickname for Cuba, is also a beautiful photo book celebrating Cuba’s landscape. 

NPR highlights several books, movies, and music that will help you dive into the Cuban culture. Truly, this list is extensive and will have you adding to your TBR!

You can get a look at modern-day Cuba thanks to the gorgeous images on Lonely Planet! 

National Geographic Kids has a great overview and introduction to Cuba for students. 

Let’s begin by taking a look at the timeline of President Bashar al-Assad’s life and timeline in Syria from CNN.

Learn more about what is happening in Aleppo.

 Lonely Planet advises against traveling to Syria, but it does have some informative maps and information to learn more about the country from home. 

What does "Daesh" mean and why is it important? Find out here!

Explore Mecca and the annual religious pilgrimage in this short clip from National Geographic. 

If you’d like more detailed information on Mecca and its importance, this website is a great place to start! 

The BBC does a great job explaining the importance of hijabs in Islam.

Three young girls explain in their own words why they wear hijabs as a part of their religion. 

Learn the history of the European Union in this quick two-minute video

Scholastic has created a reading guide for book clubs and educators to use with the book. This one even has standard and core alignment for educators to use. 

You can learn more about author, Alan Gratz, on his website and find some great recommendations for further research. 

Buzzfeed recently published several “six word stories” from immigrants from all over the world. We thought this would be a great place to share this perspective.

 

RESOURCES RELATED TO MUSIC OF THE GHOSTS

Readers, sometimes the best way for me to connect to a book is to immerse myself in the culture it explores. Our related resources for Music of the Ghosts focus on the sights, sounds, and tastes of Cambodia and the historical background of Khmer Rouge. 

Let’s start off by taking a look at the book trailer for Music of the Ghosts!

Looking for a good beverage to sip while reading Music of the Ghosts? Why not try this recipe for Cambodian coffee

This banana rice pudding sounds like a delightful treat at the end of the day. 

You can also listen to the Khmer rock ballad that Narunn and Teera sing to each other, ”Allo Oun, Allo Bong”

Even Teera uses a Lonely Planet guide on her way back to Cambodia. Explore the country through images and videos from the comfort of your own home. 

History of Khmer Rouge from the BBC

Learn more about the rise and fall of Khmer Rouge Khmer Rouge 

Pol Pot was the leader of the communist Khmer Rouge government in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979. During his reign, an estimated 1.5 to 2 million Cambodians died of starvation, execution, disease or overwork. You can learn more about Pol Pot in this resource from History.com. 

Life in Phnom Penh is best explored in these short video collections. How do these images align with what you read in Music of the Ghosts? 

Learn more about stupas in Cambodia and see examples.

Learn more about the significance of stupas in Buddhist culture.

Read an English translation of Arthur Rimbaud’s poem Guerre, which makes such a strong impression on Tun as a student at Chomroeun Vichea high school. In reading this poem, think about what light does it sheds on the character of the young Tun, or the Old Musician he becomes. 

Simon and Schuster has created a reading guide for book clubs and educators to use with the book.

RESOURCES RELATED TO INSIDE OUT AND BACK AGAIN

PBS has a great docuseries with information on the Vietnam War. 

Explore Ho Chi Minh City (formerly known as Saigon) through images and videos from the comfort of your own home. 

For a quick overview, History.com has an overview of the Vietnam War. 

Take a look at the traditions and the customs of Tet, the Vietnamese New Year celebration, with both of these great resources.

Banh Chung is a square rice cake. It is traditionally served during Tet and its presentation has changed over the years. 

Learn how to make Vietnamese fish dipping sauce!

Want to try mung bean cookies? Give this recipe a try!

Bruce Lee comes up multiple times in this story, thanks to Hà's brother Vu who is so obsessed with Bruce Lee that he calls himself Vu Lee. If you’ve never seen Bruce Lee in action, this compilation will certainly give you a taste of his style. 

Harper Collins has created a reading guide for book clubs and educators to use with the book. 

Thanhha wrote an op-ed in the New York Times from the point of view of her mother, who is very much like the mother in Inside Out & Back Again. 

Shmoop has a great list of added resources for you to explore. We don’t want to steal their thunder by listing them all out again, but they sure are worth a click over to their site to see what they’ve compiled!

Explore more about the book and the author on Thanhha's website