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October 2018 Related Resources: Books in Translation

 Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.

Wanting to dig deeper into one of our selections? We research related resources -- articles, videos, and more -- to help you expand your knowledge beyond the pages of our selections.


Our resources this week focus on all things related to The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi.  We’re excited to share links and information that will help you get to know the author, the historical background of the story, terms used in the story, and reactions to topics covered in the graphic novel.

RESOURCES RELATED TO PERSEPOLIS

Persepolis is a “bildungsroman” story, meaning it is a type of coming of age graphic novel.  Learn more about bildungsroman here.

You can rent and stream the film version of Persepolis on Amazon and Youtube.  Ebert liked the movie back when it came out in 2008, and he even briefly shares his own experience in Iran in the late 1970s (he gives that a thumbs up, too).

There’s a lot to keep track of throughout Satrapi’s story, so Shmoop has created a timeline to help you keep the events straight. If you’re looking for a background of the historical timeline, you can check that out here too.  

Wondering what’s up with the title? Shmoop has you covered with a brief explanation here. You can check out what remains of the ancient city of Persepolis and see how Persepolis may have been inspired by the carvings on the wall.

“Like Spiegelman's ''Maus,'' Satrapi's book combines political history and memoir, portraying a country's 20th-century upheavals through the story of one family.” Check out what else The New York Times has to say about Satrapi’s graphic novel blending history with personal experience, and see what Satrapi says about her reasoning behind creating her graphic novel.

Persepolis might be in black and white, but that doesn't mean Iran is. In 2013, photographer Afra Pourdad did a photo shoot in Iran for FSHN magazine to show just how colorful the place is.

Satrapi loved punk rock when she was growing up. Iggy Pop is a punk rock god, so it's pretty awesome that Satrapi got to cast Iggy Pop as the voice of Uncle Anoosh in the English-language dub of the Persepolis movie.

Is there a difference between telling a true story and making an autobiography or documentary? Marjane Satrapi addresses this question and others, like the "mess" of making a comic into a cartoon.

There's a pivotal scene in the book when Marji hears the National Anthem of Iran on the radio. Take a listen. It has to be better than the new government's Islamic hymn that was forced upon them.

If you’re interested in reading more books that correlate with the themes and topics of Persepolis, check out the suggested reading below:

For Further Viewing/Movies:

Have any more resources you think we should share in regard to Persepolis? Share them in the comments below!  Let us know which resources were the most helpful and interesting!